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Bacterial Whole Cell Protein Profiling: Methodology, Applications and Constraints

[ Vol. 16 , Issue. 2 ]

Author(s):

Neelja Singhal, Anay Kumar Maurya and Jugsharan Singh Virdi*   Pages 102 - 109 ( 8 )

Abstract:


Background: In the era of modern microbiology, several methods are available for identification and typing of bacteria, including whole genome sequencing. However, in microbiological laboratories or hospitals where genomic based molecular typing methods and/or trained manpower are unavailable, whole cell protein profiling using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis might be a useful alternative/supplementary method for bacterial identification, strain typing and epidemiology. Whole cell protein profiling by SDS-PAGE is based on the principle that under standard growth conditions, a bacterial strain expresses the same set of proteins, the pattern of which can be used for bacterial identification.

Objective: The objective of this review is to assess the current status of whole cell protein profiling by SDS-PAGE and its advantages and constraints for bacterial identification and typing.

Results and Conclusion: Several earlier and recent studies prove the potential and utility of this technique as an adjunct or supplementary method for bacterial identification, strain typing and epidemiology. There is no denying the fact that utility of this technique as an adjunct or supplementary method for bacterial identification and typing has already been demonstrated and its practical applications need to be evaluated further.

Keywords:

Whole cell protein profiling, protein fingerprint, bacteria, identification, SDS-PAGE, typing.

Affiliation:

Department of Microbiology, University of Delhi South Campus, Benito Juarez Road, New Delhi-110021, Department of Microbiology, University of Delhi South Campus, Benito Juarez Road, New Delhi-110021, Department of Microbiology, University of Delhi South Campus, Benito Juarez Road, New Delhi-110021

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